Ils l'ont fait: l'OMS invente l'alcoolisme passif

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Ils l'ont fait: l'OMS invente l'alcoolisme passif

Message  alexandra le Dim 20 Avr 2008 - 19:21

Trade dismisses "passive drinking" claims
17 April, 2008

By Olivia Boyd

Higher taxes would target wrong people, say industry bodies

Industry leaders have hit out at health campaigners who want to deal with “passive drinking” by raising the price of alcohol.

In a report published today, the World Health Organisation demanded greater taxation on booze to help tackle domestic violence and road accidents.

But Mark Hastings of the British Beer and Pub Association (BBPA) said the concept of passive drinking was “about as believable as passive eating”.


He said: “By targeting the entire population, governments are wasting huge amounts of taxpayers’ money and failing to tackle the real issue. It’s not the drink that’s the problem, it’s the behaviour of an irresponsible minority.”

Tony Payne, chief executive of the Federation of Licensed Victuallers Associations, said alcohol was a soft target.

“People tend to pick on the easy thing to blame, which is alcohol,” he said. “But when it’s sensibly dealt with, alcohol is a good thing for people to go out and relax and meet people,” he said.

And Tony Jerome of the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) added: “We all realise the big problem is the supermarkets selling cheap alcohol in an uncontrolled environment. They are hitting the wrong people.”


alexandra

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Re: Ils l'ont fait: l'OMS invente l'alcoolisme passif

Message  alexandra le Dim 20 Avr 2008 - 19:24

On avait pourtant prevenu les non fumeurs:les miliciens ne se contenteront pas de la cigarette. Mais ce qui arrivent aux autres je m'en fous et puis les fumeurs sont nuisibles nous pas alors on est pas concerné. Grave erreur mais peut etre qu'ils vont commencer à comprendre maintenant.

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Re: Ils l'ont fait: l'OMS invente l'alcoolisme passif

Message  alexandra le Dim 20 Avr 2008 - 19:29

The war on ‘passive drinking’
Posted by Bruno Waterfield on 17 Apr 2008 at 21:27
Tags: Crime, EU, public health, Alcohol
European Union and United Nations officials are plotting to make drinking as socially unacceptable as smoking.


Your drink could endanger others, claim UN and EU officials

Hectoring campaigns over “passive smoking” are credited for Europe’s almost total smoking ban. Now alcohol is in the sights of the public health miserablists and they have invented the concept of "passive drinking" as their killer argument.

The Daily Mail takes up a report in New Scientist to trumpet a new “guilt campaign” that is heading our way. “The World Health Organisation's global strategy will aim to match the success of campaigns which have made smokers feel guilty about the harm second-hand smoke does to others,” says the report.

Ian Gilmore, president of the Royal College of Physicians is wheeled on to confirm the new approach. “The tipping point for banning smoking in public places was third party damage,” he said.

The EU public health brigade are not far behind, in fact Brussels miserablists in the European Commission’s DG SANCO have been trying to poison the drinking debate with this new assault on reason for years.

I took up the EU “passive drinking” debate around two years ago in response to strident claims, in a Commission report, about the high environmental or social toll of alcohol, the “harm done by someone else’s drinking”.

“The total tangible cost of alcohol to EU society in 2003 was estimated to be €125bn (€79bn-€220bn), equivalent to 1.3 per cent GDP, and which is roughly the same value as that found recently for tobacco,” said the report written by Dr Peter Anderson, who has a background in the World Health Organisation (WHO) and who played a leading role in Tobacco Free Initiative Europe.

“The intangible costs show the value people place on pain, suffering and lost life that occurs due to the criminal, social and health harms caused by alcohol. In 2003 these were estimated to be €270bn, with other ways of valuing the same harms producing estimates between €150bn and €760bn.”

On Thursday, at an informal meeting of health ministers in Brdo, Slovenian Health Minister, Zofija Mazej Kukovič dusted off the report – and its language.

“Harmful and dangerous alcohol consumption causes more than seven per cent of the premature morbidity and mortality in our countries. The annual costs stemming from this have been estimated at as much as €125 billion for the EU as a whole. However, the harm caused by alcohol is still underestimated,” she said.

The figures are meant to be pretty scary. Drink is responsible for 2,000 homicides, four out of 10 of Europe’s annual murders. “The economic cost of alcohol-attributable crime has been estimated to be €33bn in the EU for 2003….while the intangible cost of the physical and psychological effects of crime has been valued at €9bn - €37bn,” said the Anderson report.

Children, too, are passive victims of drinking. “Many of the harms caused by alcohol are borne by people other than the drinker responsible. This includes 60,000 underweight births, as well as 16 per cent of child abuse and neglect, and five to nine million children in families adversely affected by alcohol,” says the EU report’s summary.

The link made by between alcohol and crime today, whether violence or child abuse or other social ills, follows not from hard facts but from an outlook that sees human characteristics as damaging in general. And if human beings, particularly when under the influence of stimulants, are destructive, then, the argument goes, social intervention must follow. The idea that almost any activity – drinking, eating, speaking, even thinking – can cause harm is often blown out of proportion and used to generate frightening figures and policies.

The sheer absurdity of the idea of “passive drinking” would be funny if the public health lobby was not so powerful and unpleasant. I found that in a twist of irony, probably lost on po-faced public health types, that the expression "passive drinking" seems to have originated as a spoof in two Peter Simple columns in the Daily Telegraph in 2002 and 2003, written by the late Michael Wharton.

Mocking the rise of nonsense research to justify social measures, he wrote about research work being carried out by “Dr Ron Hardware of Nerdley University”. “They were the first to discover the scourge of ‘passive drinking’, showing by painstaking experiments and finely adjusted statistics that it was just as deadly as 'passive smoking' and equally capable of causing cancer and innumerable other ills,” he wrote.

It is no longer a joke or satire – do read more here on Spiked. We need to stand up to these people.

http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/foreign/brunowaterfield/april/passivedrinkingguilt.htm

alexandra

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Re: Ils l'ont fait: l'OMS invente l'alcoolisme passif

Message  alexandra le Dim 20 Avr 2008 - 19:39

Two points raised in the Rapid Responses immediately prior to this come together with a question I have written about for several years. USDHHS (U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services) has classified Ethyl Alcohol as a carcinogen. To be true, they have only classified it as such when it is "consumed," presumably in liquid form, but alcohol is a very volatile liquid. (1)

A cigarette emits roughly a half milligram of active Class A carcinogens with the most significant in terms of weight being benzene at 3/10ths of a milligram. A standard martini releases roughly one full gram of the Class A carcinogen ethyl alcohol into the air in the space of an hour: an amount equal to 2,000 cigarettes. You can see this for yourself most clearly if you pour a large shot (48 grams) of grain alcohol into a martini glass and set it someplace ventilated and safe for two days. When you come back it will be gone. If the cat didn't drink it the alcohol went into the air and was breathed and ingested by any who wandered through the room during that period.

Some might claim that DHHS specified "consumption" of alcohol in order to rule out any airborne effects, but to say that mucosal cancers from liquid alcohol do not imply mucosal cancers from evaporated alcohol makes an absolute mockery of the old "tar in acetone painted on mouse skin" proofs that medical scientists were so fond of in the 1950s and 60s.

As Dr. Lee, in the Response immediately above this one, points out: "Logic dictates that if cigarette smoke is harmful when inhaled into the lungs of smokers then the same smoke when inhaled into the lungs of non- smokers will also be harmful. To argue otherwise would be foolhardy." People like myself argue that the dilution of that smoke, particularly in modern venues with far better ventilation than generally reflected in epidemiological studies based on exposures stretching back 30 or 40 years, make a huge difference.

Nonsmokers in well designed and ventilated bars and restaurants would normally inhale no more than a few micrograms of active Class A carcinogenic material from cigarettes. In exceptionally well designed and ventilated venues the total amount would probably be measurable only in nano- and picograms. The alcohol case is clearly far stronger: nondrinkers would be likely to inhale milligrams rather than mere micrograms in drinking allowed venues... particularly if smoking is banned and ventilation levels reduced.

Of course there's no massively funded Antialcohol lobby to run huge epidemiological studies on passive drinking and such studies would be very difficult to design. Non-drinking bar workers could be compared to non- drinking pool-hall workers (both groups would be exposed to similar amounts of smoke thereby removing that as a variable) but such population pools aren't very large. However, as Luc Bonneux pointed out above, risk management often involves making decisions "not supported by hard epidemiologic data."

He also points out that risk management principles dictate that "risks are to be reduced to levels as low as possible. The lowest level possible is easy to identify: apply the law, ban smoking in all public places." Following those principles, and following the thinking and reasoning of Dr. Lee, one would have to accept the necessity of banning alcoholic drinks in restaurants and perhaps even in bars.

Sure, it might hurt their businesses a bit. Fancy upscale restaurants would lose their profits on $100 bottles of wine and the clientele frequenting bars would probably suffer an initial dip until people got used to enjoying each others' company over glasses of vegetable juice or soda pop. However, as has been stated consistently by smoking ban proponents, any possible risk to health is first and foremost: nonpartakers should not be forced to partake anything over a zero- tolerance exposure to any potentially harmful chemical, and the removal of drug use from the visual environment of children and teenagers will make them less likely to become addicted themselves.

We should remember that underage drinkers account for nearly 20% of alcohol consumption (2) while underage smokers account for just 3% to 5% of the cigarette market (3). Would removing alcohol from bars, restaurants, TV commercials, movies, and sports events while quintupling its taxes cut underage drinking by 400%? Antismoking advocates feel such measures are effective for tobacco so they should be similarly effective for alcohol, true?

Do I really think alcohol should be banned from bars and restaurants, from movies and TV, from sports events and wedding champagne toasts? Of course not: the risk levels of nondrinkers, if evaluated honestly in studies not funded by pressure groups would be below consideration by any rational person. And anyone who did not want to be exposed to such fantastical wisps of risk could simply avoid establishments where alcohol was allowed.

Exactly the same argument can be made about smoking and smoking bans.

Michael J. McFadden

Author of "Dissecting Antismokers' Brains"

http://cantiloper.tripod.com

References:

(1) National Toxicology Program. DHHS. 11th Report on Carcinogens http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/roc/eleventh/known.pdf

(2) Foster, S.E., R.D. Vaughn, W.H. Foster and J. A. Califano, Jr. 2003. Alcohol consumption and expenditures for underage drinking and adult excessive drinking. JAMA 289 (Cool: 989-95

(3) Viscusi, W. Kip. "Smoke and Mirrors...." The Brookings Review, Winter 1998 Vol. 16 No. 1, pp. 14-19

I am a member of several Free Choice organizations, and have absolutely no financial interests with Big Tobacco, Big Hospitality, or any other player in this arena other than as a customer and as the author of a book in the field.

Competing interests: I am a member of several Free Choice organizations, and have absolutely no financial interests with Big Tobacco, Big Hospitality, Big Pharma, or any other player in this arena other than as a customer and as the author of a book in the field.

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/eletters/330/7495/812#105082

alexandra

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Re: Ils l'ont fait: l'OMS invente l'alcoolisme passif

Message  alexandra le Dim 20 Avr 2008 - 20:39

Pour l'instant je n'ai pas trouvé d'article en français alors pour ceux qui ne parle pas anglais je résume. L'OMS a rangé l'Ethyl (que l'on trouve dans les alcools) dans la catégorie des substances cancérigènes or celui-ci s'évapore sous forme de particules qui bien sur tuent votre voisin. Les miliciens psychorigides (anal retentive en anglais; je trouve que ça sonne vraiment bien) anti-alcool se sont jetés sur le concept et en rajoute une couche:l'alcool est responsable des femmes et enfants battus, des accidents de voitures,du travail et domestiques. L'alcool coute des milliards à la collectivité bla,bla,bla,bla,bla. Ca vous rappelle quelque chose ? psychorigides et obsessionnels. On appelle les hommes en blanc ?

alexandra

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